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thelivingwiccan:

Did somebody say tea? Let’s talk about tea witchcraft for a second!
If you know me at all, you’d know that I really enjoy finding ways to express witchcraft in everyday life. I’m a huge tea-drinker. Mainly, teas that I brew myself. It’s a little misleading, because what I drink isn’t usuall “tea” - no tea leaves to be found. Mostly they’re roots and leaves of different herbs all thrown together with some hot water; here we’ve got mint and licorice root, my favorite.
Now this particular pot wasn’t made for any witchcraft purposes, but just think of all the possibilites!
rosehip brew, for relationship rituals
honeycomb brew, for sweetening dispositions
sage brew, for personal purifications (another method of achieving this, perhaps?)
clover brew, for luck
And don’t even get me STARTED on the other potential magic. What about actually writing a sigil on a piece of organic paper, and then throwing it in the teapot while it’s brewing? (Keep in mind though, that you’d have to use:)
some sort of unbleached, organic paper (rice paper?) AND
edible ink (chocolate sauce? raspberry juice? Mmmm…)
This sort of thing would fall under kitchen withcraft/hearth witchcraft, for those who are interested. 
I’m off to drink tea now. I’m getting excited just thinking about it — all those possibilities! 
Happy casting!
-TLW
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Samsung SGH-S730M
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thelivingwiccan:

Did somebody say tea? Let’s talk about tea witchcraft for a second!

If you know me at all, you’d know that I really enjoy finding ways to express witchcraft in everyday life. I’m a huge tea-drinker. Mainly, teas that I brew myself. It’s a little misleading, because what I drink isn’t usuall “tea” - no tea leaves to be found. Mostly they’re roots and leaves of different herbs all thrown together with some hot water; here we’ve got mint and licorice root, my favorite.

Now this particular pot wasn’t made for any witchcraft purposes, but just think of all the possibilites!

  • rosehip brew, for relationship rituals
  • honeycomb brew, for sweetening dispositions
  • sage brew, for personal purifications (another method of achieving this, perhaps?)
  • clover brew, for luck

And don’t even get me STARTED on the other potential magic. What about actually writing a sigil on a piece of organic paper, and then throwing it in the teapot while it’s brewing? (Keep in mind though, that you’d have to use:)

  • some sort of unbleached, organic paper (rice paper?) AND
  • edible ink (chocolate sauce? raspberry juice? Mmmm…)

This sort of thing would fall under kitchen withcraft/hearth witchcraft, for those who are interested.

I’m off to drink tea now. I’m getting excited just thinking about it — all those possibilities

Happy casting!

-TLW

ithehornedone:

ithehornedone:

BLESSINGS TO GREENMAN

1st Image: Natural Reactor (Great Link to GreenMan Inspired Music)

2nd Image: Phipps Conservatory

3rd Image: Faces of the Oak King From American Folkloric Witchcraft:

Names
Cernunnos, Green Man, Woodwose, Vindos, Pwyll, Freyr, Lugh, Apollo, Lucifer, Herne the Hunter, Karnayna, Faunus, Cern, Dianus, Sylvanus, Edric, Orfeo, Tapio, Dusio, Derg Corra, Green George, Jack in the green, John Barleycorn, Robin Goodfellow, Gwythyr ap Greidawl

Station of the Wheel
Southeast, Summer Solstice (Midsummer), June, Stone Castle, Mead Moon

Totems
Stag, Oak, Robin

Tools
Stone Bowl

Cernunnos in Celtic iconography is often portrayed with animals, in particular the stag, and also frequently associated with a the ram-horned serpent, besides association with other beasts with less frequency, including bulls (at Rheims), dogs, and rats. Because of his frequent association with creatures, scholars often describe Cernunnos as the “Lord of the Animals” or the “Lord of Wild Things”, and Miranda Green describes him as a “peaceful god of nature and fruitfulness”.

The Green Man motif has many variations. Found in many cultures around the world, the Green Man is often related to natural vegetative deities springing up in different cultures throughout the ages. Primarily it is interpreted as a symbol of rebirth, or “renaissance,” representing the cycle of growth each spring.

The wild man or woodwose is a mythical figure that appears in the artwork and literature of medieval Europe. Images of wild men appear in the carved and painted roof bosses where intersecting ogee vaults meet in the Canterbury Cathedral, in positions where one is also likely to encounter the vegetal Green Man. The wild man, pilosus or “hairy all over”, and often armed with a club. The image of the wild man survived to appear as supporter for heraldic coats-of-arms, especially in Germany, well into the 16th century.

There are several examples of the Romano-Celtic God Vindos maq Noudons which can be easily referenced within texts. Most deal with the root “vin” which means “light” or “white.”

4th Image: The Oak King — Cernunnos

The Beneficent Order of the Greenman

Brightest Blessings to You!

Lughnasa Blessings.

Bountiful and Grateful First Harvests

book-ofshadows:

Lughnasadh Recipe: Cinnamon Braid Bread [x]

Ingredients

  • 2 1/4 cups flour
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 3/4 cup lukewarm milk
  • 1 tbsp sugar
  • 15 g fresh yeast (1 envelope active dry yeast)
  • 1/8 cup (30 g) melted butter
  • 1 egg yolk

Filling

  • 1/4 cup (50 g) softened butter
  • 4 or 5 tbsp sugar
  • 3 tsp cinnamon
  • 3 tsp grounded almonds or macadamias, optional

Directions

  1. In a medium bowl stir yeast with sugar. Stir in the milk and then add the egg yolk and melted butter.
  2. In a large bowl whisk together the flour and salt. Pour the milk mixture over the dry ingredients and start kneading it until it pulls away from the edges of the bowl. Give the dough the shape of a ball. Sprinkle oil onto a clean bowl, place the dough and cover with plastic wrap. Let it rest for about 1 hour at room temperature until doubled in size.
  3. While the dough rises, whisk together the butter with sugar and cinnamon for the filling. Set aside.
  4. Preheat the oven to 400 F (200 C). Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  5. On a floured surface, using a rolling pin roll the dough to a rectangle of about 18x12 inches.
  6. Spoon the cinnamon filling over top (keep about 1 tbsp of the filling for the end), spreading evenly, leaving a clean 1/2-inch border around the edges. Sprinkle the nuts over the cinnamon filling.
  7. Roll up the dough and using a sharp knife, cut the log in half length-wise stopping 1/2 inch from one end to keep it together.
  8. Twist the two pieces, keeping the open layers exposed so the cut ends remain on top..Pinch the ends together and form a wreath.
  9. Transfer it to the prepared baking sheet. Brush the wreath with the left cinnamon filling.
  10. Bake for 20-25 minutes until golden brown. For the last 10 minutes you can reduce the oven temperature to 180 C (350 F).

captain-rachel:

Welcome To Night Vale Scarf

Good evening listeners. Captain_Rachel—you know, the girl with the awkwardly fashionably mullet? The one who made that knitting pattern for a WTNV pillow? Well Captain_Rachel stopped by the station today and dropped off a new pattern for all of our knitting listeners out there in Night Vale and all of our listeners who have a knitter trapped in their basement in case of emergencies. That pattern can be found on google docs at the following link or on Raverly at this link… although one again I don’t know how she intends for you to follow those since it just says “link” and isn’t written out…

magickandcrack:

Lammas (Lughnasadh)
August 1st

Lammas, also known as Lughnasadh, (I choose to say Lammas because that’s easier to say haha), is the “cross-quarter” day marking the first harvest of early grain, where the first loaf of the bread from the harvest is broken and shared in the name of the Goddess. It is the sabbath that marks the end of summer where grains are harvested and stored for the cold months to come. All crops associated with grain and of the season are sacred to this time. It is a time to reflect on the successes of the year and to reward yourself for jobs well done.
Lammas magic can be magic of facing up to change. The God gives his energy to the crop to ensure life while the Goddess as Mother prepares to transform into her aspect as the Crone. the God loses his strength as the days grow shorter.

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